WTO Turnaround 2013: Food, Jobs and Sustainable Development First – Statement

October 2013

After more than three decades of experience with a corporate-led model of globalization, it is clear that this particular model of globalization has failed workers, farmers, and the environment, while facilitating the vast enrichment of a privileged few. The emergence of the global financial and economic crises of the last five years have exposed many negative impacts of policies, such as: deregulation of the financial sector resulting in financial collapse and job loss; commodification of the agricultural markets resulting in food price volatility and hunger; “race to the bottom” liberalization policies for production leading to deadly calamites, such as the collapse of the factory in Bangladesh where more than 1000 textile workers perished; intellectual property monopolies limiting global access to life-saving medicines; and corporate-trade-expansion (rather than trade-for-development) policies exacerbating the climate crisis. Despite this incredible harm, these liberalization, deregulation, and corporate monopolization policies form the backbone of the current global trade system, consolidated by the World Trade Organization (WTO) since 1995.

The emergence of the global financial, food, economic, and other crises – which the WTO’s privatization and liberalization rules contributed to, and failed to prevent – provides an opportunity to reflect on the serious problems endemic to the particular model of globalization that the WTO has consolidated globally. Unfortunately, within the WTO, there exists a colossal failure to recognize the WTO’s contribution to the global crises, and instead many members have worked to maintain the focus on increasing corporate trade without regard to the human or environmental costs. Thus, within the WTO, some members – representing their corporate interests– are even seeking to expand these failed policies in the run-up to the upcoming 9th Ministerial meeting of the WTO, which will take place in Bali, Indonesia, December 3-6, 2013.

While the global framework of these rules is set by the WTO, these same policies also appear in an even more extreme form, in regional and bilateral so-called Free Trade Agreements (FTAs) that have led to job loss, food price volatility, and increased foreign corporate control over public services and natural resources. These FTAs and the proliferation of Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs) have led to an explosion of “investor-state” cases, where many health, safety, and environmental laws have been attacked by transnational corporations at private courts, resulting in awards in the billions of dollars from taxpayers to corporations.

Given this situation, the Our World Is Not for Sale (OWINFS) network asserts that the global trade framework must work for the 99%: it must provide countries sufficient policy space to pursue a positive agenda for development and job-creation, and must facilitate, rather than hinder, global efforts to ensure true food security, sustainable development, access to affordable healthcare and medicines, and global financial stability. And it must privilege global agreements on human rights and environmental sustainability over corporate profit. Thus, a completely new institution, with a central mandate of setting trade rules that allow countries to pursue trade for sustainable development while disciplining corporate behavior, must be created.

In addition, in the interim, serious changes must be made to existing WTO policies, in order to allow countries more policy space to pursue urgent solutions to these key global challenges. And immediately, the negotiations towards the upcoming Ministerial must be overhauled to reflect the need for a radical shift in the agenda.

Current WTO Scenario: Wrong Direction, Wrong Proposals

After many failed Ministerial meetings and nearly twelve years of negotiations, the Doha Round of WTO expansion is at a crossroads. Developed countries have pushed aside agreements to negotiate on key developing country issues intended to correct the imbalances within the existing WTO, which formed the basis of the development mandate of Doha.

Even worse, developed countries appear to be re-packaging the same liberalization and market access demands of their corporate interests to create a “new trade narrative” towards gaining agreements at the upcoming 9th Ministerial in Bali. These include an agreement on Trade Facilitation, which would place excessive implementation, regulatory, human resources, and technological burdens on developing countries, while resulting in more imports into than exports from developing countries. At the same time, developed countries have failed in their obligations to ensure appropriate levels of Special and Differential Treatment (SDT) within the Trade Facilitation negotiations themselves, particularly with regards to technical and financial assistance.

At the same time, developed country corporate interests continue to marginalize the ongoing demands of developing countries in towards the Bali Ministerial. It is outrageous that rich countries oppose a proposal by the G33 group of 46 countries, to allow developing countries to subsidize poor farmers to grow food for their populations at risk of hunger. Likewise, demands by LDCs for a simple package of policies to allow them to improve the results of their participation in global trade should be approved and implemented immediately, not be pushed to the side or held hostage for other concessions by developing countries.

Thus, if there is to be any agreement for the upcoming 9thMinisterial at Bali, it must begin to rebalance the inequities of the past, such as agreement to the G33 proposal for Food Security, a strong LDC package, as well as a strong SDT package. A binding agreement on Trade Facilitation would be a tremendous step in the wrong direction.

It is of deep concern that developed countries have already launched negotiations on their post-Bali agenda, including towards an expansion of the plurilateral Information Technology Agreement (ITA). An expansion of the ITA would achieve many of the liberalization goals of developed countries from the Non-Agricultural Market Access negotiations in the Doha Round, and would have a negative impact on the ability of poorer countries to develop their technological sectors. They have also launched plurilateral negotiations on services, called the Trade in Services Agreement (TISA). The creation of a radical services FTA like the proposed TISA would result in the deregulation and liberalization of many private and public services in developing and developed countries alike. It would also reduce pressure on developed countries to concede many changes to the existing WTO demanded by developing countries in the negotiations. These two proposed agreements represent more of the failed model of liberalization and deregulation, and are opposed by civil society organizations in participating and non-participating nations, in developed and developing countries alike.

Any post-Ministerial agenda agreed to at the upcoming 9th Ministerial in Bali should not focus on “more-of-the-same” corporate agendas.

Thus, the Our World Is Not for Sale (OWINFS) network asserts that in addition to a long-term transformation of the global trade and economic architecture, immediate changes must be made to WTO in order to provide countries more policy space to pursue a positive agenda for development and job-creation, food security, sustainable development, access to affordable healthcare and medicines, and global financial stability.

The basic principles and goals underlying the WTO must be overhauled, many current WTO policies must be fixed, and many aspects of the 2001-launched Doha Round agenda must be changed. Specifically, we call on governments to transform the global trade regime through the following:

1. We Demand Jobs and Industrial Development Policy Space

Following the global financial and economic crisis, the situation of unemployment has deteriorated even further in rich and poor countries alike. Yet rather than prioritizing job-creation, the WTO framework focuses on reducing tariffs and forcing workers to compete in an uneven playing field, resulting in further erosion of jobs, rather than on using trade to increase employment. Even worse, Doha Round proposals would slash tariffs in developing countries even more than in rich countries; this would further erode decent jobs in key industries. Already vulnerable developing countries should not have to “pay” for fixes to the current global trading system with offering more market access, which would destroy their prospects for industrial development.

            -Any current or future agreement must focus on using trade to expand employment, such as through the Decent Work Agenda, and protecting policy space of countries, rather than just cutting tariffs.

            -The expansion of the Information Technology Agreement (ITA) must be abandoned.

            -In any future negotiations in Non-Agricultural Market Access (NAMA), the Swiss formula should be abandoned; talks must be based on the mandate of Less Than Full Reciprocity; discussions on sectorals must be voluntary; manufacturing jobs should not be “traded off” for agricultural jobs, and there should be no anti-concentration clause, as countries must maintain the flexibility to protect vulnerable and labor-intensive sectors.

            -We call for Impact Assessments with regards to NAMA talks. We need assessments on the qualitative and quantitative aspect of any future potential WTO agreements on employment and also the environment. 

2. We Demand the Right to Protect the Policy Space for Development

Trade must be available to developing countries to be utilized as a tool for development. Trade is not the goal per se. If the actual result of trade under the current or proposed rules hinders the ability of poor people and poor countries to develop, then new rules are needed. Starting well before the 2001 Doha Round, developing countries have put forward myriad proposals in the WTO that would allow them to access the benefits of trade while maintaining policy space for development. These include the original proposals, referred to as the “Implementation Issues,” drafted more than a decade ago and submitted an as alternative to the Doha Round agenda, that are designed to fix the asymmetries and biases of the Uruguay Round. In addition, the trade concerns of the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) should not fall victim to the extreme demands of the rich countries for more market access in the emerging market nations. Developing countries have put forward proposals that would allow the LDCs to safeguard development policy space while gaining the benefits of trade. In addition, the negotiations on Trade Facilitation, if implemented as they are currently negotiated, would place undue financial, human resources, and technology burdens on developing countries, and result in far more facilitation of imports than exports. Thus:

            -The proposed agreement on Trade Facilitation should be voluntary for developing countries. The proposals on Special and Differential Treatment (SDT) in these negotiations must be strengthened and completed, including technical and particularly financial assistance, to developing countries’ satisfaction, before any binding commitments on Trade Facilitation are requested of them.

            -The proposed LDC package, including Duty-Free Quota-Free access for LDCs, and a fair and immediate resolution to the demands of the cotton-producing countries, and a services waiver for LDCs, should be adopted whether or not a complete Doha package is finalized.

            -Implementation Issues must be restored as the main focus for the WTO for the years following the 9th Ministerial Conference. A real development agenda, which has been missing from negotiations at the WTO, would focus on reforming rules on intellectual property, services and goods, so that they are more helpful for development.

            -The thorough re-negotiations of a full range – not a limited set – of proposals to ensure SDT for developing countries should be prioritized as the key aspect of any forward negotiations.

            -If LDCs pursue accession into the WTO, their entry must not be conditioned on market access demands, but should be able to accede on terms that allow them to use trade according to their development needs. These terms should not go beyond those applied to original LDC Members of the WTO. 

3. We Demand Financial Stability Rather than Financial Deregulation

The deregulation and liberalization rules of the WTO in the financial services sector helped set the stage for the debacle of the global financial crisis. Yet, while the G20, most governments and even the IMF have recognized the need for financial re-regulation in the wake of the financial crisis, the WTO’s General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS) rules can actually hinder financial regulation efforts; and current proposals in the GATS negotiations would established additional limits on domestic regulation and extend the coverage of deregulation requirements. Immediate changes are needed to current GATS rules regarding financial services, and no further deregulation or liberalization of financial services should be undertaken within the WTO. In addition,

            -Countries should not take any additional commitments for liberalization of trade in financial services within GATS negotiations or through the proposed plurilateral Trade in Services Agreement (TISA).

            -Existing and proposed GATS rules should be reviewed in light of the financial crisis, and then clarified and/or modified in order to ensure policy space for all countries to use macroprudential measures, such as capital controls and financial transaction taxes, as well as to implement other financial regulatory and prudential measures.

            -It is not appropriate within the context of the WTO or TISA to elaborate or adopt disciplines on domestic regulation in the accountancy sector agreed to before the financial crisis, or to adopt or elaborate any other disciplines on domestic regulation.  

4. We Demand Access to Health and Affordable Medicines before Patent Monopolies

Advocates for access to health care and affordable medicines gained an important victory in 2001 through the adoption of the Doha Declaration on Public Health and the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) agreement. This declaration reaffirmed the flexibilities contained in the TRIPS agreement and its use to address the public health needs of WTO member states. However, the negotiations that followed the Declaration that were to have facilitated export of medicines under compulsory licensing for countries having insufficient or no manufacturing capabilities concluded without establishing a workable mechanism to translate the agreed rights into real access. Thus, public health has suffered due to the complex and stringent patent monopolies that are prioritized above ensuring access to medicine. Thus:

-Member states must review the August 30th decision of 2003 to waive Article 31 (f) of TRIPS and the subsequent decision to amend the TRIPS in 2005, and improve these decisions to make them workable.

-Members should agree to a permanent moratorium on non-violation TRIPS complaints.

            -Members must make permanent the waiver of TRIPS obligations for LDCs, as long as they are LDCs, without any conditions, including allowing LDC members to roll back existing TRIPS implementation. 

5. We Demand Trade Rules that Support Food Security and Sovereignty

Another global food crisis has again highlighted our broken system of trade in food, which exposes farmers to floods of imports when prices are too low (often due to unfair export subsidies in rich countries) while at the same time expanding the ranks of humans suffering from hunger when food prices spike. This volatility is a result of excessive speculation in the commodities markets, and global food rules – written largely to satisfy corporate agribusiness – that treat food as a product for corporate profit instead of a Human Right. It is time for a fundamental transformation of the food system, and the following changes to the WTO are essential for a global system that would ensure Food Sovereignty and Food Security to develop:

            -Developing countries should have the right to subsidize food for the poor, including through direct payments to poor farmers, as proposed in the current negotiations by the G33 to promote Food Security.

            -Developing countries should have the right to raise tariffs and use other measures to protect farmers’ livelihoods, rural development, and food security. This ability, called the Special Safeguard Mechanism (SSM) in the WTO, must be far more flexible than is reflected in current WTO proposals for it to be useful in achieving food security. No additional commitments on Agriculture should be made of LDCs.

            -Developing countries should be able to exempt products from any potential future tariff cuts as they deem necessary to protect farmers’ income, food security and rural development; the Special Products designation in the WTO must be expanded. We reject any standstill on tariffs in agriculture.

            -Export subsidies should be disciplined, including so-called “Green Box” subsidies.

            -Trade rules must be modified to facilitate proper regulation of commodities to prevent excessive speculation and volatility in the global markets.

            -Special attention should be paid to banning subsidies of agro-fuels, as they have diverted land away from food production and aggravated ecological degradation. 

6. We Demand Protection of Biodiversity and the Banning the Patenting of Life

One of the important outcomes of the Doha declaration is to examine the relation of TRIPS agreement with the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). Ten years of deliberation has led to concrete proposals to amend the TRIPS agreement to prevent biopiracy.

-Members should amend the TRIPS agreement to require disclosure of country of and proof of prior informed consent and fair and equitable benefit sharing.

-The mandatory review of the patenting of life obligation under article 27.3 (b) of the TRIPS Agreement must be completed. The long pendency of the mandatory review cast doubts on the rules-based approach. We reiterate the call for a ban on patenting of life forms as many developing countries have proposed. 

7. The WTO Is Not the Venue to Establish Climate Change Policy

Putting climate change on the agenda of the WTO would represent a grave danger to climate stabilization, as WTO rules structurally favor the increasing of trade flows – a huge contributor to the greenhouse gases that cause climate change – over environmental sustainability. While several aspects of current WTO rules should be altered to allow more policy space for countries to protect the environment and pursue sustainable development policies, other multilateral agencies are far more appropriate venues for the discussion of and implementation of rules related to the global climate than the WTO.

-TRIPS rules should be altered to allow countries to negotiate additional flexibilities to the intellectual property regime, regarding technology transfer, including in other multilateral venues.

-Climate change policies should not be subject to challenge through the WTO’s Dispute Settlement Mechanism.

-No new “climate change” agenda should be introduced at the WTO. 

8. We Demand the Right to Regulate Essential Services

The existing GATS rules should not be the basis for liberalization. By conflating liberalization and deregulation, the GATS Market Access rules prohibit public interest regulations that apply equally to domestic and foreign firms to promote financial stability, consumer safety, public health, environmental quality and educational access. The GATS contains additional limits on domestic regulation with respect to qualification requirements and procedures, technical standards and licensing requirements.

-Any plurilateral agreement on services, such as the Trade in Services Agreement (TISA) should not be expand the deregulatory requirements that already exist in the GATS, and should not be used as a basis for any multilateral services negotiations.

-Public services in particular must be excluded from any services agreement with a broad and authentic carve-out.

There are many more changes that must be made to the global trading system, including a fundamental review, abrogation, or transformation of bilateral and regional trade and investment agreements. The above represent immediate changes that must be made to the WTO to provide more policy space for countries to implement solutions towards resolving the global crises for the benefit of all. 

OWINFS is a global network of over 200 civil society organizations from more than 50 countries. For more information, contact OWINFS at djames@cepr.net

Initial endorsers as of October 28, 2013 include: 

 

International and Regional Organizations and Networks

1

ACP Civil Society Forum

The Forum is a coalition of 80 not-for-profit organisations working on issues relating to ACP-EU development cooperation. It seeks to cater for the diverse range civil society development issues within the wide geographic coverage of the ACP group.

2

Arab NGO Network for Development (ANND)

ANND is a regional network, working in 12 Arab countries with seven national networks (with an extended membership of 200 CSOs from different backgrounds) and 23 NGO members.

3

Asia Pacific Mission for Migrants (APMM)

A regional migrant centre working in the Asia Pacific and Middle East region.

4

Asian Peasant Coalition (APC)

Represent more than 15 million rural members (e.g. landless peasants, peasant women, dalits, agricultural workers, fisherfolks, pastoralists, and rural youth) from 33 organizations from Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mongolia, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, and Sri Lanka, struggling for genuine agrarian reform and people's food sovereignty.

5

Association pour la Taxation des Transactions financiÚre et l'Aide aux Citoyens (ATTAC) European Network

ATTAC is an international organization involved in the alter-globalization movement. We oppose neo-liberal globalization and develop social, ecological, and democratic alternatives so as to guarantee fundamental rights for all.

6

Caribbean Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era (DAWN)

A regional network of scholars and researchers who work on the issues of political economy, trade, Sustainable Development; Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights; governance and women's equal participation in power and decision-making.

7

Dignity International

Dignity International’s vision is of a world in which everyone enjoys human rights and lives in dignity; free from fear, poverty and discrimination. Dignity International advocates with, connects, and supports the empowerment of deprived and struggling communities in claiming their human rights, and creating social justice around the world.

8

IBON International

IBON initiates and implements international programs, develops and hosts international networks, initiates and participates in international advocacy campaigns, and establishes regional and country offices. IBON strengthens links between local campaigns and advocacies to international initiatives.

9

International Presentation Association (IPA)

The mission of IPA is to channel our resources so that we can speak and act in partnership with others for global justice.

10

LDC Watch

LDC Watch is a global alliance of national, regional and international civil society organisations (CSOs), networks and movements based in the Least Developed Countries (LDCs).

11

Pacific Network on Globalisation (PANG)

PANG is a Pacific regional network promoting economic justice in globalisation with specific attention to:1) Accountability and transparency in economic and trade policy processes, 2) Poverty eradication, 3) Equitable development and sustainable livelihoods (opportunity, access, impact) and 4) Food sovereignty and environmental sustainability.

12

PaxRomana ICMICA Asia

Global network of Catholic leaders committed to justice, peace and creation.

13

Public Services International (PSI)

Public Services International (PSI) is a global trade union federation dedicated to promoting quality public services in every part of the world. PSI brings together more than 20 million workers, represented by 650 unions in 150 countries and territories. 

14

South Asia Alliance for Poverty Eradication (SAAPE)

An alliance to fight against poverty and injustice in South Asia comprising journalists, academics, trade unionists, human rights activists, NGOs and other civil society actors across the region.

15

Southern Africa Trade Union Coordination Council (SATUCC)

SATUCC is a regional trade union organization representing all major trade union federations in the Southern African Development Community (SADC). It was established in   March 1983 and today SATUCC is the only formally recognised representative regional trade union confederation with a special status in the SADC.

16

Southern and Eastern African Trade, Information and Negotiations Institute (SEATINI)

An African initiative to strengthen Africa's capacity to take a more effective part in the emerging global trading system and to better manage the process of Globalization.

 

National Organizations 

17

51% Coalition

Jamaica

18

Action Développement et Intégration Régionale (ADIR)

Burundi

19

Action, Research and Education Network of Aotearoa (ARENA)

New Zealand

20

Advocate for Safe Parenthood (ASPIRE)

Trinidad and Tobago

21

Africa Europe Faith and Justice Network (AEFJN)

Belgium

22

Africa Youth Coalition Against Hunger

Sierra Leone

23

Agricultura Alternativa y de Alerta ante la Transgénesis (AGALAT)

Panama

24

Agricultural Workers Union of TUC

Ghana

25

Aid/Watch

Australia

26

Alianza ONG

Dominican Republic

27

Aljawf Women Organization For Development

Yemen

28

All Lanka Peasant's Front

Srilanka

29

All Nepal Peasants Federation (ANPFa)

Nepal

30

Alliance Pour la Reconstruction et le Developpement Post-Conflit (ARDPC)

Ivory Coast

31

Alliance Against WTO

Bangladesh

32

Alliance Sudd

Switzerland

33

Alternative Information & Development Centre

South Africa

34

Amigos de la Tierra México

Mexico

35

Anguilla National Council of Women (ANCW)

Anguilla

36

Andhra Pradesh Vyavasaya Vruthidarula Union (APVVU)

India

37

Argentine Federation Of Commerce And Services Workers (FAECyS)

Argentina

38

Asia Monitor Resource Centre (AMRC)

Hong Kong

39

Asociacion Ecologica De Lanus (AEL)

Argentina

40

Association Commerciale, Agricole, Industriel et du Service (ACAISA)

Cape Verde

41

Association of Women's Organizations  of Jamaica (AWOJA)

Jamaica

42

Association pour la Taxation des Transactions financiÚre et l'Aide aux Citoyens (ATTAC) Quebec

Canada

43

Association pour la Taxation des Transactions financiÚre et l'Aide aux Citoyens (ATTAC) Spain

Spain

44

Association pour la Taxation des Transactions financiÚre et l'Aide aux Citoyens (ATTAC)

Tunisia

45

Association Women Sun of Haiti

Haiti

46

Australian Fair Trade and Investment Network (AFTINET)

Australia

47

Bahrain Transparency Society

Bahrain

48

Banana Link

UK

49

Bangladesh Krishok Federation 

Bangladesh

50

Barbados Association of Non Governmental Organizations

Barbados

51

Barbados National Organization of Women

Barbados

52

BASE Investigaciones Sociales

Brazil

53

Belize Enterprise for Sustainable Technology

Belize

54

 Berne Declaration

Switzerland

55

Bharatiya Krishak Samaj

India

56

Bia'lii, Consultancy and Research

Mexico

57

Botswana Council of Non Governmental Organisations (BOCONGO)

Botswana

58

Business and Professional Women Barbados

Barbados

59

Cadre de concertation des OSC pour le suivi du CSLP (CdC/CSLP)

Burkina Faso

60

Campaign 2015+ International

Nigeria

61

Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW)

Canada

62

Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU)

South Africa

63

Capítulo Argentino PIDHDD

Argentina

64

Caribbean Association for Feminist Research and Action (CAFRA)

Trinidad and Tobago

65

Center for Alternative Research and Studies (CARES)

Mauritius

66

Center for Health, Human Rights and Development (CEHURD)

Uganda

67

Central Unitaria De Trabajadores (CUT)

Colombia

68

Centre d’Information et de Liaison des ONG (CILONG)

Chad

69

Centre de Recherche et d'Action pour le Développement (CRAD)

Haiti

70

Centre du Commerce international pour le Developpement (CECIDE)

Guinea

71

Centre for Literacy and Community Development

Kenya

72

Centre National et International de Documentation et d’Information des Femmes en Haiti (ENFOFANM) Haiti

Haiti

73

Childolesent And Family Survival Organization - Women's Rights Action Group (CAFSO-WRAG)

Nigeria

74

CIID

Gautemala

75

Civil Society Bahamas

Bahamas

76

Civil Society Coalition on Migration and Development

Nigeria

77

Civil Society Forum of Tonga (CSFT)

Tonga

78

Civil Society Movement of Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone

79

Civil Society Organization Network for Development (RESOCIDE)

Burkina Faso

80

Codepink

USA

81

Colectivo VientoSur

Chile

82

Colectivo Voces Ecológicas (COVEC)

Panama

83

Comité Forum Social Lémanique (FSL)

Switzerland

84

Comité pour l’Annulation de la Dette du Tiers Monde (CADTM)

Tunisia

85

Community Empowerment for Progress Oranization (CEPO)

South Sudan

86

Concertation Nationale Des Organisations paysannes et des Producteurs (CNOP)

Gabon

87

Confederacion Nacional De Unidad Sindical (CNUS)

Dominican Republic

88

Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU)

South Africa

89

Conseil de Concertation des ONGs de Développement (CCOD)

Congo

90

Conseil des ONG Agrees du Cameroun (CONGAC )

Cameroon

91

Conseil Inter ONG En Centrafrique (CIONGCA)

Central African Rep.

92

Conseil National des ONG de Développement (CNONGD)

D.R. Congo

93

Consejo de Investigaciones para el Desarrollo de Centroamérica (CIDECA)

Gautemala

94

 Consejo Nacional de Auto empleados y Micro empresarios del Perú (CONAEM PERU)

Peru

95

Consumer Education Trust

Uganda

96

Consumers Protection Association (CPA)

Lesotho

97

Cook Islands Association of Non-Governmental Organisations (CIANGO)

Cook Islands

98

Coordination nationale des organisations paysannes du Mali

Mali

99

Cotonou Task Force

Ethiopia

100

Council for NGOs (CANGO)

Swaziland

101

Council of Canadians

Canada

102

 Cristianas y Cristianos De Base De Madrid

Spain

103

Development Service Exchange (DSE)

Solomon Islands

104

Dominica National Council of Women

Dominica

105

Eastern and Southern Africa small-scale Farmers Forum (ESAFF)

Zambia

106

Economic Justice Network Lesotho (EJNL)

Lesotho

107

Economic News Africa

Kenya

108

Ecuador decide

Ecuador

109

Equity and Justice Working Group Bangladesh (EquityBD)

Bangladesh

110

 Fair Trade Advocacy Office

Belgium

111

Fairwatch

Italy

112

Federación de Trabajadores del Agua Potable y Alcantarillado del Perú (FENTAP)

Peru

113

Federation de Femmes Enterpreneurs et Affairs de la CEDEAO (FEFA)

Guinea

114

Foro Ciudadano de Participación por la Justicia y los Derechos Humanos (FOCO)

Argentina

115

Forum das Ong de São Tomé e Principe (FONG-STP)

Sao Tomé and Principe

116

Fórum das Organizações Não Governamentais Angolanas (FONGA)

Angola

117

Forum des ONG pour le Développement Durable (FONGDD)

Eq. Guinea

118

Fundacion de Relaciones Internacionales (FUNREI)

Argentina

119

Foundation pour le Developpment au Sahel (FDS)

Mali

120

Friends of the Earth

Ghana

121

FSM Alliance of NGOs (FANGO)

Micronesia

122

Gilbert Agricultural and Rural Development Centre (GARDC)

Antigua and Barbuda

123

Global Exchange

USA

124

Globalization Watch Hiroshima

Japan

125

Gonoshasthaya Kendra (GK )

Bangladesh

126

Good Shepherd International Justice Peace Office

USA

127

Grassroots Organisations of Trinidad & Tobago (GOTT)

Trinidad and Tobago

128

Grenada National Organization of Women

Grenada

129

Groupe d'Action et de Reflexion sur l'Environnement et le Développement (GARED)

Togo

130

Groupe de Recherche et d'Action pour la  Promotion de l'Agriculture et du Développement (GRAPAD)

Benin Republic

131

Grupo Tacuba

Mexico

132

Guyana Association of Women Lawyers

Guyana

133

Hecho en Bs As / empresa social

Argentina

134

Hegoa Instituto de Estudios sobre Desarrollo y Cooperación Internacional, País Vasco

Spain

135

Help & Shelter

Guyana

136

Initiatives for Dialogue and Empowerment through Alternative Legal Services (IDEALS)

Philippines

137

Institute for Economic Research and Innovation (IERI)

South Africa

138

Institute for Global Justice (IKG)

Indonesia

139

 Instituto de Participación y Desarrollo

Argentina

140

Instituto Justiça Fiscal (IJF)

Brazil

141

Instituto Nacional de Estudos e Pesquisa (INEI)

Guinea-Bissau

142

Instituto Latinoamericano para una sociedad y un derecho alternativos (ILSA)

Colombia

143

Inter Agency Group of Development Organizations (IAGDO)

Grenada

144

Iyanola (St.Lucia) Council for the Advancement of Rastafari Incorperated (ICAR)

St. Lucia

145

Jamaica Network of Rural Women Producers

Jamaica

146

Jamaicans United for Sustainable Development

Jamaica

147

Jubilee Debt Campaign

UK

148

Kalingo Carib Council

Dominica

149

Kenya Debt Relief Network (KENDREN)

Kenya

150

Kilusang Magbubukid Ng Pilipinas  (KMP)

Philippines

151

Kilusang Mayo Uno  (KMU)

Philippines

152

Kiribati Association of Non-Governmental Organisation (KANGO)

Kiribati

153

Labour,Health and Human Rights Development Centre

Nigeria

154

Lesotho Council of NGOs (LCN)

Lesotho

155

Liaison Unit of the non-governmental organisations of Seychelles -(LUNGOS)

Seychelles

156

Lutte Nationale Contre la Pauvreté (LUNACOP)

DR Congo

157

Malawi Economic Justice Network

Malawi

158

Marshall Islands Council of NGOs (MICNGOS)

Marshall Islands

159

Mauritius Council of Social Service (MACOSS)

Mauritius

160

Melanesian NGO Centre for Leadership (MNCL)

Papua New Guinea

161

Movement for National Land and Agricultural Reform (MONLAR)

Sri Lanka

162

Namibia Non-Governmental Organisations Forum Trust

Namibia

163

National Agricultural workers Forum (NAWF)

India

164

National Alliance of People's Movements (NAPM)

India

165

National Association of NGOs (NANGO)

Zimbabwe

166

National Association of Nigerian Traders (NANTS)

Nigeria

167

National Center For Labour (NCL)

India

168

National Council of NGOs

Kenya

169

National du Réseau des Ong de Développement et Associations de Défense des Droits de l'Homme et de la Démocratie (RODADDHD)

Niger

170

National Fisheries Solidarity Movement [NAFSO]

Sri Lanka

171

National Forum for Mozambiquan NGOs and CBOs (TEIA)

Mozambique

172

Nauru Island Association of NGOs (NIANGO)

Nauru

173

National Justice and Peace Network (NJPN)

UK

174

Network for WomenÂŽs Rights and Feminist Perspectives in Development (WIDE)

Austria

175

Network of Women's NGOs

Trinidad and Tobago

176

New Hope Youth Trust

Botswana

177

Niue Island (Umbrella) Association of NGOs (NIUANGO)

Niue

178

Nou Sud

Spain

179

Online Knowledge Society

Bangladesh

180

Otros Mundos AC

Mexico

181

Plate-forme des acteurs non étatiques pour le suivi de l'Accord de Cotonou au Sénégal

Senegal

182

Plateforme haïtienne de Pladoyer pour un Développement Alternatif (PAPDA)

Haiti

183

Plate-Forme Nationale des Organisations de la Societe Civile de Madagascar

Madagascar

184

Policy Analysis and Research Institute of Lesotho (PARIL)

Lesotho

185

Pour Social Develpment Cooperative (SDC - RCA)

Central Africa Rep.

186

Poverty Action Network in Ethiopia (PANE)

Ethiopia

187

Professional Organization for Women in Antigua

Antigua

188

Programme de Plaidoyer Pour une Intégration Alternative (PPIA)

Haïti

189

Rape Crisis Society of Trinidad & Tobago

Trinidad and Tobago

190

Rassemblement pour une Alternative Internationale de Développement (RAID)

Tunisia

191

Red Mexicana de Acción Frente al Free Comercio (RMALC)

Mexico

192

Red NicaragÃŒense de Comercio Comunitario (RENICC)

Nicaragua

193

Red Thread

Guyana

194

Regional en América Latina del Centro de Solidaridad Sindical de Finlandia

Finland

195

Resist Agrcohemical TNCs

Philippines

196

Resistance & Alternatives

Mauritius

197

Resistance and Alternatives to Globalization (RAG)

Indonesia

198

Roots for Equity

Pakistan

199

Rural Reconstruction Nepal (RRN)

Nepal

200

Rwanda Civil Society Platform

Rwanda

201

Samoa Umbrella for Non Governmental Organisation (SUNGO)

Samoa

202

SAVE Foundation Inc. (Services Alliance for Violent Encounters)

Barbados

203

Seruni

Indonesia

204

Siglo XXIII

El Salvador

205

Simpson Foundation Malawi

Malawi

206

Sistren Theatre Collective

Jamaica

207

Sociedad Económica de Amigos del País

Cuba

208

Solidarité

France

209

Somali Organisation for Community Development Activities (SOCDA)

Somalia

210

South African NGO Council (SANGOCO)

South Africa

211

Southern and Eastern African Trade, Information and Negotiations Institute (SEATINI) Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe

212

Southwest Freedom of Information Act Network

Nigeria

213

Stichting Projekta

Suriname

214

Tanzania Association of NGOs

Tanzania

215

Tchad Agir Pour l’Environnement (TCHAPE)

Chad

216

Técnicos Sin Fronteras

Argentina

217

The Asia Foundation

Timor-Leste

218

The Call for Africa Development [CAD]

Lesotho

219

Toledo Maya Women's Council

Belize

220

Tuvalu Association of NGOs (TANGO)

Tuvalu

221

Uganda Environmental Education Foundation (UEEF)

Uganda

222

Unidad Ecológica Salvadoreña (UNES)

El Salvador

223

Union Nacional De Trabajadores

Mexico

224

United Methodist Church Philippines

Philippines

225

 Universidad libre flotante

El Salvador

226

Universidad libre para la Paz

El Salvador

227

Vanuatu Association of NGOs (VANGO)

Vanuatu

228

Voices for Interactive Choise and Empowerment (VOICE)

Bangladesh

229

War on Want

UK

230

West African Women Association (WAWA)

Liberia

231

Windward Islands Farmers’ Association (WINFA)

St. Vincent and the Grenadines

232

Woman Inc.

Jamaica

233

Women Across Differences (WAD)

Guyana

234

Women Against Rape

Antigua

235

Women Working for Social Progress

Trinidad and Tobago

236

Women's Crisis Centre

Jamaica

237

Women's Institute for Alternative Development (WINAD)

Trinidad and Tobago

238

Women's Issues Network of Belize

Belize

239

Women's Media Watch Jamaica

Jamaica

240

Women's Resource and Outreach Centre

Jamaica

241

Women's Rights Centre

Suriname

242

World Democratic Governance project Association (WDGpa)

Spain

243

World Development Movement (WDM)

UK

244

Worldview

Gambia

245

Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) Barbados

Barbados

246

Youth Foundation of Bangladesh (YFB)

Bangladesh

247

Zambia Council for Social Development

Zambia