Global Civil Society letter on the Nairobi Ministerial of the World Trade Organization (WTO), December 9, 2015

Delivery date: 
9 December, 2015

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Dear Members of the WTO,

As members of 460[1] civil society organizations including trade unions, environmentalists, farmers, development advocates, and public interest groups from over 150 countries, we are writing today to express extreme alarm about the current situation of the negotiations in the WTO. We urge you to take seriously the need for the upcoming Nairobi Ministerial to change existing WTO rules to make the global trading system more compatible with people-centered development, and to forestall efforts by some developed countries to abandon the development agenda and replace it with a set of so-called “new issues” that actually are non-trade issues that would impact deeply on domestic economies and constrain national policy space required for development and public interest.  

Governments from around the world recently endorsed the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) negotiated through the United Nations. These include key goals such as reducing poverty and inequality; eradicating hunger; and ensuring universal access to essential services such as health care, education, water, and energy. In order to achieve these goals, countries must have the policy space to invest in domestic agricultural production to achieve food security and food sovereignty; to regulate the financial sector to ensure financial stability; to scale up public provision of essential services to guarantee education, health, water, and energy access; to harness the power of government procurement to promote small and medium enterprises (SMEs); to utilize tax revenues, including tariffs, strategically to foment sustainable development and the creation of jobs with decent work; and to ensure that foreign investment serves the interests of the national development plan. However, this policy space is currently constrained by existing WTO rules which the vast majority of WTO members, which are developing countries, have been demanding must be changed, and are further threatened by an effort by a tiny number of developed countries to replace the development mandates with “new issues” designed to further increase transnational corporate profit margins.

As civil society organizations, we have witnessed firsthand in our communities the negative impacts of 20 years of some existing WTO policies which have largely favored the interests of the developed world over the development interests of the developing world. This has particularly led to rising inequalities both within and among countries; the contributions of increased trade to climate change; the financial deregulation that led to the 2008 global economic crisis and the ongoing crises of food insecurity and joblessness, to name a few. Many of our organizations have called repeatedly for the WTO to be replaced with an institution that regulates corporate trade for the benefit of workers, farmers, communities, and the environment, rather than disciplining states for the narrow goal of increasing trade. At the same time, we must ensure that the WTO’s model of restricting national policy space in favor of corporate trading rights must not be expanded, but rather pruned back. That is why it is so urgent at this time to ensure that the Nairobi Ministerial deliver on removing WTO obstacles to development by fulfilling the development mandate in terms of strengthening and making effective the Special and Differential Treatment (SDT) for all developing countries, and affirming developing countries’ rights to food security, while forestalling the corporate agenda of abandoning development in favor of a corporate wish list of “new issues.”   

Success in Nairobi: Fulfilling the Development Mandate by Strengthening SDT for All Developing Countries, Removing WTO Obstacles to Food Security, and Operationalizing Benefits for the Least Developed Countries (LDCs)

This year, a group of 90 (G90) developing countries made concrete proposals for changes to existing WTO rules that would remove some WTO constraints on national pro-development policies. Many of these proposals parallel the civil society demands encompassed in the Turnaround Statement endorsed by hundreds of civil society groups from around the world. Reports from Geneva indicate that a tiny number of high-income WTO members are attempting to decide for themselves which developing countries should be able to utilize these flexibilities, dividing developing countries according to non-existent, subjective criteria and attempting to treat so-called “emerging markets” as if they were already developed. This approach has no basis in WTO law, in development policy, nor in economic reality. In fact, 70 percent of the world’s poor live in so-called “middle income” countries; narrowing the scope of the G90’s special and differential treatment proposals would condemn a billion people to living under WTO rules inappropriate for their level of development, without the flexibilities and policy space requisite for their countries to achieve the multilateral SDGs. For those reasons, SDT should be strengthened and made operational for all developing countries, while providing additional flexibilities to LDCs that attend to their specific development, financial and economic needs. The WTO Ministerial will be a failure for development if the full package of G90 proposals for all developing countries is not agreed to in Nairobi. 

Even worse, just one WTO member – the United States – appears to be not only refusing to agree to the full G90 package, but also working to ensure that the development mandate in the WTO is permanently abandoned. While a lack of agreement on the G90 package of proposals by Nairobi would indicate a failure of the Ministerial from a development perspective, the abandonment of the entire development mandate would lock out the potential to fulfill this mandate in the future, thus locking the world into the existing inequalities and imbalances forever – at the behest of one member of the WTO, an institution that claims to operate by consensus.

Likewise, many of those same impoverished people in developing countries and LDCs alike continue to suffer from food insecurity. Since the Bali Ministerial in December 2013, developing countries and anti-hunger advocates and farmers around the world (including in the United States) have worked to ensure that developing countries would be unshackled from WTO rules which severely constrain their ability to invest in public stockholding programs, even though such investments are explicitly called for in the SDGs in order to reduce rural and urban hunger. WTO members agreed to find a permanent solution to the issue of public stockholding for food security by December 31, 2015. The G33 group of 45 developing countries has made a workable proposal to remove limits on developing countries’ investing in their own food security by categorizing public stockholding for food security in the so-called “Green Box,” and this must be adopted by the Nairobi Ministerial. The WTO Ministerial will be a failure from a development perspective if this simple step towards food sovereignty is not agreed to in Nairobi.

In one of the most hypocritical positions in the history of global trade negotiations, some developed countries are not only opposing the right of poor countries to feed themselves, but also refusing to reduce domestic supports on exported agricultural production that damages other countries’ domestic markets. In fact, the promise to reform global agricultural trade was the primary reason that developing countries even agreed to launch the Doha Round. Fourteen years later, some developed countries continue to subsidize agricultural exporting corporations in ways that damage farmers in developing countries, whose governments are not allowed (or cannot afford) such subsidies. We support the concept of food sovereignty, in which countries should be allowed to undertake domestic supports of agricultural production, but no country should be allowed to export subsidized food in a way that damages other countries’ markets. The WTO Ministerial will be a failure from a development perspective if the disciplining of domestic supports that damage other countries’ markets is not agreed to in Nairobi.

At the same time, the havoc wreaked on developing country agricultural markets due to dumping of subsidized products calls out for an immediate solution. The G33’s proposal to create a Special Safeguard Mechanism (SSM) that would allow developing countries to protect their food security, farmers’ livelihoods, and rural development, would be another important step towards restoring countries’ food sovereignty that has been so eroded by the current imbalances in the WTO rules. The WTO Ministerial will be a failure from a development perspective if a workable, practical SSM along the lines of the G33 proposal is not agreed to in Nairobi.

Even in the area that all WTO members should be able to agree on – ensuring benefits for the LDCs – consensus has not yet been reached. Although it was a priority mandate for the post-Bali period, the small LDC package agreed in Bali has yet to be operationalized, including ensuring 100 Duty Free, Quota Free (DFQF) market access for LDCs exports; providing actual binding commitments for the LDC services waiver, and full simplification of the Rules of Origin (RoO). In addition, cotton farmers in Africa have been damaged for years due to the subsidies that rich countries have agreed to discipline in an “expedited” manner. The WTO Ministerial will be a failure from a development perspective if the disciplining of subsidies in cotton is not agreed to in Nairobi, along with the operationalizing of all aspects of the full LDC package.

Introducing a Corporate Wish List of “New Issues” Must be Off the Table at Nairobi

We can all agree that global trade has evolved significantly since the Doha Round was launched in 2001. Unfortunately, many workers and farmers are still laboring under the rules negotiated in the mid-1990s – to which many developing countries and civil society around the world objected at the founding of the WTO. It is vastly inappropriate to mandate negotiations on new issues to the benefit of the financial, technology, and logistics corporations a few WTO members without first addressing the inequities and imbalances in the current WTO rules.

Many of these issues have been explicitly rejected by the WTO membership in the recent past, particularly the so-called “Singapore issues,” including investment, competition policy, and transparency in government procurement. Civil society has long opposed the international investment agreements (IIAs) which privilege foreign investors over citizens, communities, the environment, and the public interest generally, whether they appear in bilateral, plurilateral, or multilateral forums. Multiple governments have taken heed of the explosion of cases brought by investors against sovereign governments, and are re-shaping national investment rules to ensure that they benefit the national interest. During this time of shifting public debate on the negative impacts of such agreements, it is outrageous to think of allowing this ejected topic back into the WTO. Similarly with the topics of competition policy and opening up government procurement to foreign corporations, which are advantageous predominantly to corporate interests. Government procurement is an important engine for local development and for addressing inequities within countries, and these goals should take precedence over opening markets for transnational bidders. These are not primarily trade issues and they must not be allowed on the agenda – and there is not even any legal basis in the WTO to bring them in until after the development demands of developing countries have been comprehensively addressed.

Likewise there appears to be an effort by some developed countries to bring issues that many developing countries, and civil society around the world, have rejected in bilateral or plurilateral so-called free trade agreements (FTAs) into the WTO. This appears to include the idea of giving new “rights” to advanced technology corporations to unlimited cross-border data transfers through e-commerce talks. A few members also appear interested in imposing on the WTO membership including disciplines (constraints) on state-owned enterprises (which can be a key engine of domestic economic growth in many countries), and other so-called “new issues” which have yet to be defined by members seeking the mandate nonetheless to discuss them. The WTO Ministerial will be a failure from a development perspective if “new issues” – including under the sneaky rubric of “discussions on global value chains (GVCs) or the digital economy” – are agreed to in Nairobi as part of the post-Ministerial agenda.

Civil society has long witnessed and condemned the unfair negotiations process in the WTO, in which the positions of powerful members are given predominance over the positions and needs of the vast majority of members who are developing countries, while the interests of workers, farmers, and the environment are shunted to the background in favor of corporate profit objectives. It is most unfortunate that under the current leadership, this phenomenon appears to have become even worse, even though the Director General hails from a developing nation.

Nairobi will be a crucial arbiter of the future of the global trade system. Will the WTO continue business as usual, in which the corporate interests of the powerful countries dominate, and the development mandate is abandoned in favor of talks on liberalization of new issues? Or will the WTO members heed the needs of the LDCs; of the poor in all our countries; of farmers struggling to make a living; of workers seeking decent work; and of the environment for our common stewardship?

For the Ministerial to “work” for food, jobs, and sustainable development, the necessary outcome is clear: the transformation of the gross inequities in the global agricultural system must begin, including: removing WTO obstacles to public stockholding for food security; a concrete and workable SSM; and disciplining domestic supports and export competition. Across the WTO, development demands must be met, including the full scope of the G90 proposals for all developing countries, and the operationalizing of the LDC package. The corporate and rich country government agenda of permanently abandoning the development mandate must be forestalled, along with the imposition of a set of already-rejected or ill-defined non-trade “new issues.”

Sincerely,

Endorsers as of December 14, 2015

International Networks and Organizations

1

ACP Civil Society Forum

The Forum is a coalition of 80 not-for-profit organisations working on issues relating to ACP-EU development cooperation. It seeks to cater for the diverse range civil society development issues within the wide geographic coverage of the ACP group.

2

ActionAid International

ActionAid is an international organisation, working with over 15 million people in 45 countries for a world free from poverty and injustice.

3

African Center for Trade, Integration and Development (ENDA CACID), West Africa

Le Centre Africain pour le Commerce, l’Intégration et le Développement (CACID) est créé pour soutenir les efforts des pays africains pour atteindre des objectifs de développement qui impactent positivement et durablement sur les conditions de vie de la majorité des citoyens, en particulier des plus pauvres.

4

Amigos de la Tierra América Latina y Caribe (ATALC) 

Amigos de la Tierra América Latina y Caribe (ATALC-Friends of the Earth (FoE) Latin Amierica and Caribbean) 

5

Arab NGO Network for Development (ANND)

ANND is a regional network, working in 12 Arab countries with seven national networks (with an extended membership of 200 CSOs from different backgrounds) and 23 NGO members

6

Asia Monitor Resource Centre (AMRC)

AMRC works to support a democratic and independent labour movement in Asia, promoting the respect of labour rights, gender equality, and active workers’ participation in work-related issues

7

Asian Farmers’ Association for Sustainable Rural Development (AFA)

AFA is a regional alliance of 17 national federations and organizations of small scale women and men farmers and producers from 13 countries in Asia.

8

Campaign2015+ International

Campaigning towards and beyond 2015 is the major thrust of Campaign2015+ International.

9

Caribbean Development Activists Network of Women (Caribbean  DAWN)

A regional network of community activists, development practitioners and scholars. We work for gender justice and sustainable human development. Caribbean Dawn provides a forum for analysis, reflection, advocacy and research on important development.

10

Caribbean Network of Rural Women Producers (CANROP)

CANROP is the umbrella organization that embraces national chapters of rural women’s associations in the Caribbean. These associations had been established in response to the need to equip women with technical, administrative and entrepreneurial skills as a means to improving their socio-economic status and create employment in the rural areas in which they live.

11

Caribbean Policy Development Centre (CPDC)

CPDC is a coalition of Caribbean non-governmental organizations. It was established in 1991 to sensitize NGOs and the general public on key policy issues and to impact policy makers on decisions which put the interests of Caribbean people at the center of the Caribbean development strategy.

12

Caribbean Youth Environment Network (CYEN)

CYEN is a regional organisation whose membership comprises youth groups and individual youth.  It aims to promote youth in the Caribbean to take positive action on issues related to environment and sustainable development.

13

Central America Women's Network (CAWN)

CAWN is a network of women united by a commitment to women’s human and labour rights worldwide. It contributes to uphold the political, social, cultural and economic rights of Central American women.

14

Confederación Latinoamericana y del Caribe de Trabajadores Estatales (CLATE) 

CLATE - es una organización sindical internacional que agrupa a los trabajadores estatales de las hermanas naciones de América Latina, con pleno respeto de las entidades afiliadas a ella, siendo encargada de fijar y ejecutar a nivel latinoamericano, la política global y coordinada de la promoción de los trabajadores estatales.

15

Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era (DAWN)

DAWN is a network of feminist scholars, researchers and activists from the economic South working for economic and gender justice and sustainable and democratic development.

16

East African Health Platform (EAHP)

The EAHP is an advocacy forum for Private Sectors Organizations, Civil Society Organizations, Faith Based Organizations and other interest groups working on health in East Africa.

17

Eastern and Southern Africa Small-scale Farmer’s Forum (ESAFF)

ESAFF is a network of small holder farmers that advocate for policy, practice and attitude change that reflects the needs, aspirations, and development of small-scale farmers in east and southern Africa. ESAFF operates in 13 countries.

18

Enda Tiers Monde

Enda is an international organization engaged in environment development action in the third world.

19

European Federation of Public Service Unions (EPSU)

EPSU is the largest federation of the ETUC and comprises 8 million public service workers from over 265 trade unions; EPSU organises workers in the energy, water and waste sectors, health and social services and local and national administration, in all European countries including in the EU’s Eastern Neighborhood. EPSU is the recognized regional organization of Public Services International (PSI).

20

Food & Water Europe

Food & Water Europe monitors the practices of multinational corporations that impact our food and water. We work with grassroots organizations around the world to create a genuinely economically and environmentally viable future. 

21

Food Sovereignty Network South Asia (FSNSA)

FSNSA works to achieve Food Sovereignty right of peoples, communities and countries to define their own agricultural, labour, fishing, food and land policies which are ecologically, socially, economically and culturally appropriate to their unique circumstances. It consist of NGOs/CSOs and People's Movements of India, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, Pakistan and Nepal.

22

Friends of the earth international (FoEI)

FoEI is the world’s largest grassroots environmental network with over 2 million members and supporters around the world.  It campaigns on today’s most urgent environmental and social issues. FoEI challenge the current model of economic and corporate globalization, and promote solutions that will help to create environmentally sustainable and socially just societies.

23

Health Innovation in Practice

HIP seeks to promote and facilitate policy action around needs-driven innovation for health at the country and regional level, as well as across countries.

24

Internacional de Servicios Públicos de Americas (ISP Americas)

En América del Norte, Central y del Sur, y el Caribe la ISP cuenta con 140 organizaciones sindicales afiliadas en 35 países, que representan a un total de 3,3 millones de trabajadores afiliados.

25

International Baby Food Action Network (IBFAN)

IBFAN is a 35-year old coalition working on the nutrition of infants and young children. It serves as an interface between the network of more than 273 not-for-profit non-governmental organisations in more than 168 countries, and the UN organizations, human treaty bodies and Geneva-based international NGOs.

26

International Grail Justice in Trade Agreement Network

A coalition of groups working for peace and justice in 20 countries worldwide.

27

International Transport Workers’ Federation (ITF)

ITF is a global union federation comprised of 700 unions representing over 4.5 million transport workers from some 150 countries around the world.

28

International Union of Food, Agriculture, Hotel, Restaurant, Catering, Tobacco and Allied Workers (IUF)

The IUF is currently composed of 385 trade unions in 123 countries representing a combined representational membership of over 12 million workers (including a financial membership of 2.6 million).

29

LDC Watch

LDC Watch is a global alliance of national, regional and international civil society organisations (CSOs), networks and movements based in the Least Developed Countries (LDCs).

30

Mesa de Coordinación Latinoamericana de Comercio Justo (RIPESS LAC)

La RIPESS es una red intercontinental que vincula las redes de economía social y solidaria de todas las regiones del planeta. Como red de redes, está compuesta de redes intercontinentales (RIPESS-LAC, RIPESS-EU, RIPESS-NA, RAESS y ASEC) que a su vez reúnen redes nacionales y redes sectoriales.

31

Movimiento Mesoamericano contra el Modelo extractivo Minero -M4-Región Mesoamérica

Movimiento Mesoamericano contra el Modelo extractivo Minero is a network struggling against mega-mining and defending land and territories. Most of our members are grassroots groups and local organizations working daily with them to grow autonomous projects. We truly believe in self-determination.

32

Pacific Network on Globalisation (PANG)

PANG is a Pacific regional network promoting economic justice in globalisation with specific attention to:1) Accountability and transparency in economic and trade policy processes, 2) Poverty eradication, 3) Equitable development and sustainable livelihoods (opportunity, access, impact) and 4) Food sovereignty and environmental sustainability.

33

Pan-African Baraza

Pan-African Baraza is a forum for amplifying the voices of movements and organisations for social justice by reclaiming the past, contesting the present and inventing the future.

34

PANOS Caribbean

Panos Caribbean is a regional organization which helps journalists to cover sustainable development issues that are overlooked and misunderstood.

35

Plataforma Interamericana de Derechos Humanos, Democracia y Desarrollo (PIDHDD)

La PIDHDD es un actor político, conformado por Capítulos Nacionales que articulan organizaciones sociales e instituciones de la sociedad civil, que promueve la plena vigencia y realización de los derechos humanos; Actualmente, se cuenta con capítulos nacionales constituidos y en funcionamiento en 16 países del continente americano: Argentina, Bolivia, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Dominicana, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, México, Nicaragua, Paraguay, Perú, Uruguay y Venezuela.

36

Public Services International (PSI)

Public Services International (PSI) is a global trade union federation dedicated to promoting quality public services in every part of the world. PSI brings together more than 20 million workers, represented by 650 unions in 150 countries and territories.

37

Public Services International (PSI), Africa and Arab Countries Region

Africa and Arab countries form one of the four regions in the PSI structure. PSI's 153 affiliated organisations in some 43 countries represent a membership of around 1.5 million people here.

38

Public Services International in the Caribbean

23 trade union organisations in 20 countries and territories in the Dutch, English, and French-speaking Caribbean. These organisations represent over 60,000 women and men who deliver valuable public services.

39

Public Services International, Asia Pacific Region

PSI's Asia and Pacific region covers 122 unions in 22 countries and related territories with a membership of two million workers.

40

Red de Educación Popular Entre Mujeres Latinoamérica y Caribe (REPEM LAC)

REPEM LAC desarrolla sus actividades en América Latina y el Caribe desde 1981. Es una entidad civil sin fines de lucro que cuenta con la participación de 65 instituciones, organizaciones y grupos de mujeres en Argentina, Bolivia, Brasil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, México, Nicaragua, Panamá, Paraguay, Perú, República Dominicana, Uruguay y Venezuela.

41

Red Latinoamericana Mujeres Transformando la Economía (REMTE)

REMTE es un espacio de articulación de redes y núcleos nacionales de once países de la región, en el que participan mujeres urbanas y rurales, de ámbitos académicos, ONG y organizaciones de base. Su propósito es contribuir a la apropiación crítica de la economía por parte de las mujeres, y a la búsqueda de alternativas basadas en la justicia económica y la justicia de género.

42

Réseau des Organisations Paysannes et des Producteurs Agricoles de l'Afrique de l'Ouest (ROPPA)

Le Réseau des organisations paysannes et de producteurs de l’Afrique de l’Ouest (ROPPA) a formellement été fondé en juillet 2000 lors d’une rencontre à Cotonou qui a rassemblé une centaine de responsables paysans mandatés par leurs organisations. Il regroupe des organisations ou "cadres de concertation" de 10 pays d’Afrique de l’Ouest (Bénin, Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Gambie, Guinée, Guinée-Bissau, Mali, Niger, Sénégal, Togo,).

43

Society for International Development (SID)

SID is an international network of individuals and organizations founded in 1957 to promote social justice and foster democratic participation in the development process. SID has over 30 chapters and 3,000 members in more than 50 countries.

44

Society of Catholic Medical Missionaries

The Medical Mission Sisters are a religious congregation of women in the Roman Catholic Church founded in 1925 and dedicated to providing the poor of the world better access to health care.

45

South Asia Farmers Forum

South Asia Farmers Forum

46

South Asia Peasants Coalition

The South Asian Peasant Coalition (SAPC) is a network of peasant organizations at the South Asian level committed to strengthen networks in the interest of the people's movements in South Asia.

47

Third World Network (TWN)

Third World Network (TWN) is an independent non-profit international network of organisations and individuals involved in issues relating to development, developing countries and North-South affairs.

48

UNI AMERICAS

UNI Americas represents 4 million workers in the Americas and the Caribbean. We are part of the 20-million strong UNI Global Union family which has affiliated 900 unions in 140 countries globally.

49

West African Civil Society Platform on the Cotonou Agreement (POSCAO)

West African Civil Society Platform on the Cotonou Agreement (POSCAO)

50

Womantra

WOMANTRA is a community of Caribbean feminists througout the Diaspora who are committed to working TOWARD gender justice ACROSS borders.

51

Women In Development Europe (WIDE+)

WIDE+ is the network that follows up the previous WIDE network (a member of S2B), composed of feminists, NGO's, researchers, etc. that advocate for a socially just economy.

National Organizations and Networks

52

S.O.S.-CEDIA

Angola

53

Fórum das Organizações Não Governamentais Angolanas (FONGA)

Angola

54

Directorate of Gender Affairs Crisis Centre

Antigua and Barbuda

55

Women  Against Rape Inc.

Antigua and Barbuda

56

Gilbert Agricultural and Rural Development Centre (GARDC)

Antigua and Barbuda

57

Argentine Federation Of Commerce And Services Workers (FAECyS)

Argentina

58

Foro Ciudadano de Participación por la Justicia y los Derechos Humanos

Argentina

59

Australian Fair Trade Investment Network (AFTINET)

Australia

60

Australian Communication Workers Alliance (ACWA)

Australia

61

New South Wales Nurses and Midwives’ Association

Australia

62

Australian Grail Justice and Trade Agreements Network

Australia

63

Informationsgruppe Lateinamerika (IGLA)

Austria

64

Hollaback! Bahamas

Bahamas

65

World Merit

Bahamas

66

Bahamas Crisis Centre

Bahamas

67

Equality Bahamas

Bahamas

68

Bangladesh Krishok Federation

Bangladesh

69

Gonoshasthaya Kendra

Bangladesh

70

VOICE

Bangladesh

71

Equity and Justice Working Group

Bangladesh

72

Textile Garments Workers Federation

Bangladesh

73

Sramabikash Kendra

Bangladesh

74

Business and Professional Women’s Club of Barbados

Barbados

75

Caribbean Women’s Association (CARIWA) Barbados

Barbados

76

Save Foundation

Barbados

77

Barbados Association of Non Governmental Organizations

Barbados

78

Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA)

Barbados 

79

Centre tricontinental (CETRI)

Belgium

80

SOS Faim

Belgium

81

CNCD-11.11.11 (Centre national de coopération au développement)

Belgium

82

Women’s  Issues Network of Belize (WINBELIZE)

Belize

83

Belize Enterprise for Sustainable Technology

Belize

84

Groupe de Recherche et d'Action pour la  Promotion de l'Agriculture et du Développement (GRAPAD)

Benin Republic

85

Centro de Estudios para el Desarrollo Laboral y Agrario (CEDLA)

Bolivia

86

Botswana Council of Non Governmental Organisations (BOCONGO)

Botswana

87

Confederação dos Trabalhadores no Serviço Público Federal (CONDSEF)

Brazil

88

Red Brasilera por la Integración de los Pueblos (REBRIP)

Brazil

89

Instituto EQUIT - Genero, Economia y Ciudadania Global

Brazil

90

Instituto Justiça Fiscal

Brazil

91

Cadre de concertation des OSC pour le suivi du CSLP (CdC/CSLP)

Burkina Faso

92

Civil Society Organization Network for Development (RESOCIDE)

Burkina Faso

93

Action Développement et Intégration Régionale (ADIR)

Burundi

94

Independent Democracy of Informal Economy Association (IDEA)

Cambodia

95

Cambodian’s Civil Servant Association (CICA)

Cambodia

96

Africa Development Interchange Network (ADIN)

Cameroon

97

Conseil des ONG Agrees du Cameroun (CONGAC )

Cameroon

98

Common Frontiers

Canada

99

MiningWatch Canada

Canada

100

Fédération interprofessionnelle de la santé du Québec-FIQ

Canada

101

Council of Canadians

Canada

102

ATTAC-Québec

Canada

103

Association Commerciale, Agricole, Industriel et du Service (ACAISA)

Cape Verde

104

Conseil Inter ONG En Centrafrique (CIONGCA)

Central African Republic

105

Centre d’Information et de Liaison des ONG (CILONG)

Chad

106

Observatorio Ciudadano

Chile

107

Chile Sustentable Fundacion

Chile

108

Confederación Nacional de Funcionari@s de Salud Municipal (CONFUSAM)

Chile

109

Federacion de Vocales Región Centro

Colombia

110

Censat Agua Viva - Amigos de la Tierra

Colombia

111

Liga Nacional de Usuarios de Servicios Públicos Domiciliarios (Liga USPD)

Colombia

112

Asociación de Servidores Públicos Departamentales y Municipales de Antioquia (ADEA)

Colombia

113

Organización Freskiemos el ambiente

Colombia

114

Asociacion Ambiente y Sociedad

Colombia

115

Federación Vocales Región Centro y Distrito Capital

Colombia

116

Grupo de Investigación en Derechos Colectivos y Ambientales (GIDCA)

Colombia

117

Cook Islands Association of Non-Governmental Organisations (CIANGO)

Cook Islands

118

Confederación de Trabajadores Rerum Novarum (CTRN)

Costa Rica

119

 Sindicato de Trabajadoras y Trabajadores de la Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica (SITUN)

Costa Rica

120

Asociación Nacional de Profesionales en Enfermería (ANPE)

Costa Rica

121

Asociación Nacional de Empleados Públicos y Privados (ANEP)

Costa Rica

122

Sociedad Económica de Amigos del País

Cuba

123

Red en Defensa de la Humanidad

Cuba

124

Ecumenical Academy

Czech Republic

125

Dominica National Council of Women

Dominica

126

Kalingo Carib Council

Dominica

127

Alianza ONG

Dominican Republic

128

Confederación Nacional de Unidad Sindical (CNUS)

Dominican Republic

129

Conseil de Concertation des ONGs de Développement (CCOD)

DR Congo

130

Recherche et Action pour un Développement Multisectoriel (RADEM)

DR Congo

131

Conseil National des ONG de Développement (CNONGD)

DR Congo

132

“Segundo Montes Mozo S.J.” (CSMM)

Ecuador

133

Red de Mujeres Transformando la Economia (REMTE)

Ecuador

134

Jubileo 2000 Red

Ecuador

135

Confederación Sindical del Ecuador (CSE)

Ecuador

136

Observatorio Ciudadano de Servicios Publicos

Ecuador

137

Egyptian Center for Economic and Social Rights (ECESR)

Egypt

138

Sindicato de Empresa Trabajadores de ANDA (SETA)

El Salvador

139

Asociación General de Empleados Públicos y Municipales (AGEPYM)

El Salvador

140

CESTA Amigos de la Tierra

El Salvador

141

Red de Ambientalistas Comunitarios de El Salvador Racdes

El Salvador

142

Forum des ONG pour le Développement Durable (FONGDD)

Eq. Guinea

143

Cotonou Task Force

Ethiopia

144

Poverty Action Network in Ethiopia (PANE)

Ethiopia

145

Ecumenical Centre for Research, Education and Advocacy (ECREA)

Fiji

146

The Finnish NGDO Platform to the EU (Kehys)

Finland

147

Solidarité

France

148

Collectif STOP TAFTA

France

149

Concertation Nationale Des Organisations paysannes et des Producteurs (CNOP)

Gabon

150

Worldview

Gambia

151

World Economy, Ecology & Development (WEED)

Germany

152

Chaos Computer Club (CCC)

Germany

153

Forschungs- und Dokumentationszentrum Chile-Lateinamerika e.V. (FDCL)

Germany

154

Campact

Germany

155

Agricultural Workers Union of TUC

Ghana

156

Naturefriends

Greece

157

Grenada National Organization of Women (GNOW)

Grenada

158

Inter Agency Group of Development Organizations (IAGDO)

Grenada

159

Federation de Femmes Enterpreneurs et Affairs de la CEDEAO (FEFA)

Guinea

160

Instituto Nacional de Estudos e Pesquisa (INEI)

Guinea-Bissau

161

Guyana Association of Women Lawyers

Guyana

162

Help & Shelter

Guyana

163

Red Thread

Guyana

164

Women Across Differences (WAD)

Guyana

165

Christian Aid

Haiti

166

Programme de Plaidoyer Pour une Intégration Alternative (PPIA)

Haiti

167

Centre de Recherche et d Action Pour le Developpement (CRAD)

Haiti

168

Plateforme Haïtienne de Plaidoyer pour un Développement Alternatif (PAPDA)

Haiti

169

Moana Nui Action Alliance

Hawaii

170

Globalization Monitor

Hong Kong

171

ATTAC Hungary

Hungary

172

All India Kisan Sabha (AIKS)

India

173

Alliance for Sustainable & Holistic Agriculture (ASHA)

India

174

IT for Change

India

175

Initiative  for Health & Equity in Society 

India

176

All India Drug Action Network . 

India

177

Navdanya 

India

178

Foundation for Science Technology & Ecology

India

179

Diverse Women for Diversity

India

180

Mahila Anna Swarajya 

India

181

National Working Group on Patent Laws and WTO

India

182

Swadeshi Andolan

India

183

ActionAid India

India

184

Indian National Defence Workers Federation (INDWF)

India

185

Bharatiya Krishak Samaj (BKS) farmers’ union

India

186

Tamil Nadu Electricity Board Accounts and Executive staff Union

India

187

Andhra Pradesh Vyavasaya Vruthidarula Union (APVVU)

India

188

National Agricultural workers Forum (NAWF)

India

189

National Center for Labour

India

190

Sunray Harvesters

India

191

Gene Campaign

India

192

National Alliance of People's Movements (NAPM)

India

193

Right to Food Campaign

India

194

CIVIC Bangalore

India

195

Paschim Banga Khet Mazdoor Samiti

India

196

Udayani

India

197

Centre for Equity Studies

India

198

Aman Biradari Trust

India

199

Vikas Samvad, Bhopal

India

200

Chaupal, Chhattisgarh

India

201

Jagriti Advisari Dalit Samiti, Barwani, Madhya Pradesh

India

202

Center for Workers Education

India

203

Wada Na Todo Abhiyan (WNTA)

India

204

Environics Trust

India

205

Communist Party of India (M-L)

India

206

Navdanya

India

207

National Federation of Indian Women

India

208

Swami Sivananda Memorial Institute

India

209

All India Agricultural Workers Union

India

210

National Confederation of Officers Association of Central PSUs 

India

211

Sanchar Nigam Executives Association 

India

212

New Trade Union Initiative (NTUI)

India

213

Swadeshi Jagran Manch

India

214

All India Drug Action Network (AIDAN)

India

215

All India Peoples Science Network (AIPSN)

India

216

All India Power Engineers Federation (AIPEF)

India

217

All India Progressive Women Association (AIPWA)

India

218

All India Students Association (AISA)

India

219

Forum Against FTAs

India

220

India FDI Watch

India

221

Indian Social Action Forum (INSAF)

India

222

Janpahal

India

223

Madhyam

India

224

The Centre for Community Economics and Development Consultants Society (CECOEDECON)

India

225

Swadeshi Andolan

India

226

Programme on Women’s Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (PWESCR)

India

227

South Asian Dialogues on Ecological Democracy (SADED)

India

228

Vasudev Kutumbkum

India

229

The Hawkers Federation

India

230

Thanal

India

231

Socialist Party

India

232

All India Union of Forest Working People (AIUFWP)

India

233

Asha Parivar

India

234

Citizen News Service (CNS)

India

235

Shetkari Sanghatana Paik

India

236

Sedane Labour Resource Center (LIPS)

Indonesia

237

Inspirator Muda Nusantara

Indonesia

238

Berdikari Institute

Indonesia

239

Indonesian Forum for Environment/Walhi

Indonesia

240

Action from Ireland

Ireland

241

Keep Ireland Fracking Free

Ireland

242

Trócaire

Ireland

243

Presentation Justice Network

Ireland

244

Galway One World Centre

Ireland

245

Comhlámh

Ireland

246

Terra Nuova

Italy

247

Osservatorio Italiano sulla Salute Globale (OISG)

Italy

248

Alliance Pour la Reconstruction et le Developpement Post-Conflit (ARDPC)

Ivory Coast

249

Association of Women’s Organization of Jamaica (AWOJA)

Jamaica

250

Fifty-One Percent Coalition

Jamaica

251

Jamaica Civil Society (Coalition) Forum

Jamaica

252

JFLAG – Women’s Empowerment for Change

Jamaica

253

Jamaica Household Workers’ Union

Jamaica

254

Jamaica Network of Rural Women Producers (JNRWP)

Jamaica

255

Jamaica Youth Advocacy Network

Jamaica

256

Grassroots Organizations Operating Together in Sisterhood (GROOTS)

Jamaica

257

Quality of Citizenship Jamaica

Jamaica

258

Institute of Gender and Development Studies (IGDS)

Jamaica

259

SISTREN Theatre Collective

Jamaica

260

Women’s Committee of the G2K  (Jamaica Labour Party  Youth Arm)

Jamaica

261

Women’s Media Watch (WMW)

Jamaica

262

Woman Inc.

Jamaica

263

Women’s  Resource and Outreach Centre (WROC)

Jamaica

264

Young Women’s Leadership Initiative

Jamaica

265

Jamaica Community of Positive Women

Jamaica

266

Yokohama Action Research

Japan

267

Globalization Watch Hiroshima

Japan

268

Kenya Small Scale Farmers Forum (KESSFF)

Kenya

269

ECONEWS Africa

Kenya

270

Kenya Food Rights Alliance (KeFRA)

Kenya

271

Southern and Eastern African Trade Information and Negotiations Institute (SEATINI) Kenya

Kenya

272

Bunge La Mwananchi Social Movement

Kenya

273

Mathare  Social Justice Centre

Kenya

274

Unga Revolution  Movement

Kenya

275

Action Green for Trade and Sustainable Development (AGTSD)

Kenya

276

The Coalition for Constitution Implementation

Kenya

277

Econews Africa

Kenya

278

Kenya Debt Relief Network (KENDREN)

Kenya

279

National Council of NGOs

Kenya

280

AwaaZ

Kenya

281

Mazingira Institute

Kenya

282

Kiribati Association of Non-Governmental Organisation (KANGO)

Kiribati

283

Rural Self-help Development Association (RSDA)

Lesotho

284

Consumers Protection Association (CPA)

Lesotho

285

Policy Analysis and Research Institute of Lesotho (PARIL)

Lesotho

286

Patriot Vision in Action (PAVA)

Lesotho

287

Lesotho Council of NGOs (LCN)

Lesotho

288

United Textile Employees (UNITE)

Lesotho

289

West African Women Association (WAWA)

Liberia

290

Cercle de Coopération des ONG de développement

Luxembourg

291

Action Solidarité Tiers Monde (ASTM)

Luxembourg

292

SOS-Faim

Luxembourg

293

Cercle de Coopération

Luxembourg

294

Plate-Forme Nationale des Organisations de la Societe Civile de Madagascar

Madagascar

295

Malawi Economic Justice Network (MEJN)

Malawi

296

Communication Workers Union of Malawi (COWUMA)

Malawi

297

Observateur de l'Union Africaine pour la composante des Droits humains au Mali (RODADDHD)

Mali

298

Reseau des ONGs de Developpement et Associations de Defense des Droits de L’homme et de la Democratie  (RODADDHD)

Mali

299

MUSONET

Mali

300

Foundation pour le Developpment au Sahel (FDS)

Mali

301

Marshall Islands Council of NGOs (MICNGOS)

Marshall Islands

302

GLOBE

Mauritania

303

Mauritius Trade Union Congress (MTUC)

Mauritius

304

Migration and Sustainable Development Alliance (MSDA)

Mauritius

305

Resistance & Alternatives

Mauritius

306

Center for Alternative Research and Studies (CARES)

Mauritius

307

Mauritius Council of Social Service (MACOSS)

Mauritius

308

Jóvenes frente al G20

Mexico

309

Asociación Nacional de Industriales de la Transformación (ANIT)

Mexico

310

Centro de Promoción y Educación Profesional "Vasco de Quiroga"

Mexico

311

Sindicato Unico de Trabajadores del Gobierno del Distrito Federal

Mexico

312

Asesoría e Investigación

Mexico

313

Grupo Tacuba

Mexico

314

Asociación Nacional de Empresas Comercializadoras de Productores del Campo (ANEC)

Mexico

315

Red Mexicana de Acción frente al Libre Comercio (RMALC)

Mexico

316

Red Nacional Género y Economía

Mexico

317

Siembra

Mexico

318

Mujeres para el Diálogo

Mexico

319

Unión Popular Valle Gómez

Mexico

320

Ombligo Verde, A.C.

Mexico

321

FSM Alliance of NGOs (FANGO)

Micronesia

322

Réseau Euromd Maroc des ONG

Morocco

323

National Forum for Mozambiquan NGOs and CBOs (TEIA)

Mozambique

324

Namibia Non-Governmental Organisations Forum Trust

Namibia

325

Nauru Island Association of NGOs (NIANGO)

Nauru

326

All Nepal Peasants' Federation (ANPFa)

Nepal

327

National Women Peasants Association

Nepal

328

Nepal Youth Peasants Association

Nepal

329

National Agriculture Labour Association

Nepal

330

Nepal Dalit and Landless farmers Association

Nepal

331

Union of Public Services in Nepal (UPSIN)

Nepal

332

Wemos foundation

Netherlands

333

Platform Aarde Boer Consument

Netherlands

334

Working group Food Justice

Netherlands

335

The New Zealand Council of Trade Unions Te Kauae Kaimahi

New Zealand

336

It's Our Future: Kiwis against the TPPA

New Zealand

337

Association Nigérienne des Scouts de l Environnement du Niger

Niger

338

National Association of Nigerian Traders (NANTS)

Nigeria

339

Labour,Health and Human Rights Development Centre

Nigeria

340

Ogoni Solidarity Forum

Nigeria

341

CAFSO-WRAG for Development

Nigeria

342

Niue Island (Umbrella) Association of NGOs (NIUANGO)

Niue

343

ATTAC

Norway

344

Campaign for the Welfare State

Norway

345

The Development Fund

Norway

346

Spire

Norway

347

Nei til EU (No to EU)

Norway

348

Fagforbundet (Norwegian Union of Municipal and General Employees)

Norway

349

Baluchistan Rural Development & Research Society (BRDRS)

Pakistan

350

NOOR PAKISTAN

Pakistan

351

Grupo de Agroecología y Soberanía Alimentaria de Panamá (GASA)

Panama

352

Sindicato de la Industria Eléctrica y Similares de la República de Panamá (SITIESPA)

Panama

353

Colectivo Voces Ecológicas (COVEC)

Panama

354

Unión Nacional de Consumidores y Usuarios de la República de Panamá (UNCUREPA)

Panama

355

Federación Nacional de Asociaciones y Organizaciones de Empleados Públicos (FENASEP)

Panama

356

Melanesian NGO Centre for Leadership (MNCL)

Papua New Guinea

357

Red Peruana de Comercio Justo y Consumo Ético

Peru

358

Federación Nacional de Trabajadores del Agua Potable (FENTAP)

Peru

359

Frente Regional Por la Defensa del Agua y la Vida Lambayeque (FREDAV-LAM)

Peru

360

IDEALS

Philippines

361

Ecumenical Institute for Labor Education and Research, Inc. (EILER)

Philippines

362

Coconut Industry Reform Movement, Inc. (COIR)

Philippines

363

Workers Assistance Center, Inc.

Philippines

364

Medical Mission Sisters

Philippines

365

Center for Trade Union and Human Rights (CTUHR)

Philippines

366

Kilusang Mayo Uno (KMU)

Philippines

367

WomanHealth

Philippines

368

Fundacja Strefa Zieleni

Poland

369

ATTAC

Poland

370

2B Fair Foundation

Poland

371

 Institute of Global Responsibility

Poland

372

Plataforma contra o Tratado Transatlântico

Portugal

373

Rwanda Civil Society Platform

Rwanda

374

Samoa Umbrella for Non Governmental Organisation (SUNGO)

Samoa

375

Ole Siosiomaga Society Incorporated (OLSSI)

Samoa

376

Forum das Ong de São Tomé e Principe (FONG-STP)

Sao Tomé and Principe

377

ARCADE

Senegal

378

L'office Africain pour le développement et la coopération (OFADEC)

Senegal

379

Plate-forme des acteurs non étatiques pour le suivi de l'Accord de Cotonou au Sénégal

Senegal

380

Liaison Unit of the non-governmental organisations of Seychelles (LUNGOS)

Seychelles

381

Civil Society Movement of Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone

382

Development Service Exchange (DSE)

Solomon Islands

383

South Durban Community Environmental Alliance

South Africa

384

Southern and Eastern African Trade Information and Negotiations Institute (SEATINI)

South Africa

385

South African NGO Council (SANGOCO)

South Africa

386

Economic Justice Network of Foccisa

South Africa

387

Korean House for International Solidarity

South Korea

388

Community Empowerment for Progress Organization (CEPO)

South Sudan

389

Unión Universal Desarrollo Solidario

Spain

390

ATTAC

Spain

391

Intersindical Valenciana

Spain

392

ATTAC BIZKAIA

Spain

393

Unión Universal Desarrollo Solidario

Spain

394

Acció Ecologista-Agró (País Valencià)

Spain

395

Ong AFRICANDO

Spain

396

Confederacion Intersindical

Spain

397

Plataforma pel Dret a Decidir del País Valencià

Spain

398

National Free Trade Union (NFTU)

Sri Lanka

399

Caribbean Association for Feminist Research and Action (CAFRA)

St. Lucia

400

Iyanola (St. Lucia) Council for the Advancement of Rastafari Incorporated (ICAR)

St. Lucia

401

Saint Lucia Crisis Centre

St. Lucia

402

United and Strong

St. Lucia

403

Windward Islands Farmers’ Association (WINFA)

St. Vincent and the Grenadines

404

Foundation Ultimate Purpose (UP)

Suriname

405

Stichting Projekta

Suriname

406

Council for NGOs (CANGO)

Swaziland

407

Coordination Climat Justice Sociale

Switzerland

408

Forum Social Lémanique

Switzerland

409

Geneva Infant Feeding Association (GIFA)

Switzerland

410

International-Lawyers.Org

Switzerland

411

Alliance Sud

Switzerland

412

Syndicat Adetra

Switzerland

413

Solidarité Bosnie

Switzerland

414

Association citoyenne pour la défense des usagers du service public (ACIDUS)

Switzerland

415

ATTAC-Suisse

Switzerland

416

ATTAC-Genève

Switzerland

417

Association Solidarité Suisse-Guinée

Switzerland

418

Tanzania Trade and Economic Justice Forum (TTEJF)

Tanzania

419

Tanzania Organization for Agricultural Development (TOfAD)

Tanzania

420

Ecosystems-Based Adaptation for Food Security Assembly (EBAFOSA)

Tanzania

421

Eastern and Southern Africa Small-scale Farmer’s Forum (ESAFF)

Tanzania

422

Governance Links Tanzania

Tanzania

423

Civil Education is a Solution for Poverty and Environment (CESOPE)

Tanzania

424

Mtandao wa Vikundi vya Wakulima Tanzania (MVIWATA)

Tanzania

425

Tanzania Association of NGOs

Tanzania

426

Thailand Confederation Trade Union (TCTU)

Thailand

427

Worldview

The Gambia

428

The Asia Foundation

Timor-Leste

429

Ligue des consommateurs du Togo (LCT)

Togo

430

Groupe d'Action et de Reflexion sur l'Environnement et le Développement (GARED)

Togo

431

Civil Society Forum of Tonga (CSFT)

Tonga

432

Grassroots Organizations Operating Together in Sisterhood (GROOTS)

Trinidad & Tobago

433

Network of NGOs Trinidad & Tobago

Trinidad & Tobago

434

Grassroots Organisations of Trinidad & Tobago (GOTT)

Trinidad & Tobago

435

Coalition Advocating for Inclusion of Sexual Orientation (CAISO)

Trinidad & Tobago

436

Caribbean Association for Feminist Research and Action (CAFRA)

Trinidad & Tobago

437

Tuvalu Association of NGOs (TANGO)

Tuvalu

438

Consumer Education Trust

Uganda

439

Southern and Eastern African Trade Information and Negotiations Institute (SEATINI) Uganda

Uganda

440

Coalition for Health Promotion and Social Development (HEPS)

Uganda

441

National Justice & Peace Network

UK

442

GMB Trade Union

UK

443

Banana Link

UK

444

StopTTIP

UK

445

Global Justice Now

UK

446

Comisión Nacional en Defensa del Agua y la Vida (CNDAV)

Uruguay

447

Comisión Multisectorial

Uruguay

448

Oakland Institute

USA

449

Medical Mission Sisters

USA

450

Americas Program of the Center for International Policy

USA

451

Institute for Policy Studies, Global Economy Project

USA

452

Friends of the Earth, U.S

USA

453

Popular Resistance

USA

454

Vanuatu Association of NGOs (VANGO)

Vanuatu

455

Scode

Vietnam

456

Al-Jawf women orgainzation for Development (ALJWOF-D)

Yemen

457

Zambia Council for Social Development (ZCSD)

Zambia

458

Centre for Trade Policy and Development (CTPD)

Zambia

459

Southern and Eastern African Trade Information and Negotiations Institute (SEATINI)

Zimbabwe

460

National Association of NGOs (NANGO)

Zimbabwe

 


 

[1] Originally signed by 453 organizations as of December 9, 2015